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a home + living guide for the post-college, pre-parenthood, quasi-adult generation

05.20.2002

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other recent LOUNGE articles:
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Gallery-style Picture Hanging Tracks
o After School
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Sew What?
o Curtain Time
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Lazy Decorator's Bag of Tricks
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Home sweet homes
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Minor Makeover Miracles: Kitchen
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CD decor
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Home/work

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DigsMagazine.com.

burn baby burn how my house was destroyed and I learned to live with less 
by Bridget Huffine
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continued from page 2

I'm not saying that you should rush to de-clutter your home and rid yourself of any and all sentimental possessions. Undoubtedly, this would later lead to thoughts of "Maybe I should have kept that." Instead, determine the value of your belongings, both in monetary terms and in their significance to your life. Decide which value is more important and distribute accordingly. If you spent a hefty sum of money on a laptop and you use it every day, keep it. If you spent an equally hefty sum of money on a dress that you wore once and will never wear again, lose it. If something was cheap and you have not emotionally bonded with that object, run, donít walk, to the nearest Goodwill.

Keep only what is necessary, but don't go into a cleansing frenzy and toss your can opener or the warranty card to that laptop. Those things will be indispensable the next time you are craving Spaghetti-O's, or if your computer flops. And it can be a very arduous task to replenish what has been lost. There are still times, even three years later, when my mother is looking for a lint roller or a bottle of sunscreen and we realize that there are many items that were never replaced after the fire. Typically, those are the things that we took for granted before, and that we can live without now.

o

Bridget Huffine (bridgeth@hotmail.com) is a freelance writer living in Denver. She is working on her first novel while finishing her Communications degree at the University of Colorado. In her spare time, she pretends that she's a designer on Trading Spaces, only without the thousand-dollar budget.

 

check out these related articles:
fight the chaos | on weeding: school stuff
simply speaking
 

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